Shinn Slicer 138 x 41.5cm 2020 Kitesurfing Review

Shinn Slicer 138 x 41.5cm 2020

Reviews / Twin Tips

Shinn 10,415

At A Glance

Shinn have a huge pedigree in the world of kitesurfing; Mark Shinn has been creating incredible boards for what feels like forever, the Slicer though, is the first split board from Shinn. Splitboards have come in various shapes and sizes over the years, but Mark took the design back to the drawing board to focus on giving the Slicer a smooth, consistent flex right through the board.

Traditionally the “split” section has been beefed up to cope with the stress, causing stiffness right where you don’t want it in the middle of the board. By using an S shape for the split and a PU insert that is flexible rather than moulding one side of the board in a manner to accept the other half, the Slicer can use a consistent lay up throughout its shape. Coupled with horizontal connection pins, that allow the whole shape to flex, Mark has created something quite special.

In terms of the shape itself, it is a free ride design with a fairly traditional outline with tucked tips and some small channels at each end. There are a constant rocker line and a progressive concave on the underside of the board.

Sizes: 138 x 41.5 and 140 x 43cm

Size When Split 83cm

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On The Water

Putting the Slicer together is a familiar experience, except instead of two pieces there are now three, with the added flexible PU joint. It’s easy to see why Mark and the team used this concept. The joint allows both sides of the board to have the same lay up and shape, and the flexible nature of the joint should mean you don’t notice any stiffness in the middle of the board.

The new Sneaker 6 pads are easy to put on and hold your foot well, and the BITE Hi-Performance fins are always a solid addition that is supplied with the whole Shinn range. Taking the board apart again is easy, pull the pins out and pull the two halves apart, be sure to keep the PU joint somewhere safe, if you lose this then you really will be in trouble.

Packing the Slicer into a split roller or similar bag is easy enough, the 83cm halves are easy to pack and the board, while a little heavier compared to a traditional twin tip, is still very light for a split board.

On the water you will find the Slicer is a very capable free ride machine, it’s fairly soft in terms of flex, but it’s a predictable ride that is very forgiving and smooth through chop. Upwind is excellent, and the tips make landings smooth. Rail to rail carving is a breeze, and it’s a fun board to smash a few waves with. Obviously, it is never going to have the pop or performance of a board like the ADHD, but this is a different craft.

Aimed at the traveller who doesn’t want to get hit with fees this is a tool for the rider who wants to take a board with them wherever they go. They sacrifice a little in performance for a whole heap of practicality, the benefit of the Slicer is that sacrifice is very minimal, it can hold its own with some of the non-split free ride boards out there. It is certainly something to ensure you save cash at the airport and have fun when you arrive!

Overall

Out of the box thinking, the PU Joint is the jewel in the crown here; it means the board can have a continuous flex without any stiff sections and helps to reduce the weight too. A stunning finish as ever with the Slicer and performance to rival a one-piece board too. If you want to cut down on baggage fees or sneak a kiteboard somewhere you shouldn’t the Slicer is certainly going to fit the bill!

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This review was in Issue 84 of IKSURFMAG.

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By Rou Chater
Rou has been kiting since the sports inception and has been working as an editor and tester for magazines since 2004. He started IKSURFMAG with his brother in 2006 and has tested hundreds of different kites and travelled all over the world to kitesurf. He's a walking encyclopedia of all things kite and is just as passionate about the sport today as he was when he first started!

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